Dining Table Types

The Type of Table Makes a Big Difference

If you have just begun your hunt for the perfect table for your dining room or kitchen, arm yourself with knowledge about how different table types may impact your choice. Below are some basic table descriptions along with features and benefits that can help you determine which table may work best for your room.

Leg Tables

The most common type of table.

Advantages:

  • Offer the most choice of sizes, styles and materials
  • Usually less expensive than comparably-sized tables with pedestals or trestles
  • Open space under table provides maximum leg room

Disadvantages:

  • Leg placement can prohibit “squeezing in” the extra guest
  • Table legs can also inhibit access particularly with bench seating in tight spaces.
  • More than 2 leaves usually requires additional center support

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Leg Table

Pedestal Tables

Tables with a center post or support that is usually cylindrical in nature, often carved or “turned”.

Advantages:

  • Stable and sturdy
  • Particularly good for round tables as there are no table legs to inhibit maximum seating
  • Many style and material options

Disadvantages:

  • Expansion is limited because table can become unstable or “tippy” as leaves are added
  • Heavier and more difficult to move than comparable leg table
  • Usually more expensive than comparable leg table

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Pedestal Table

Double Pedestal Tables

Tables with two central upright supports that are often rounded or cylindrical in nature, can be carved or “turned” and usually connected horizontally to each other.  

Advantages:

  • Stable and sturdy
  • Allows maximum seating around the table vs. leg tables
  • The double central post construction can support large expansion

Disadvantages:

  • Leg room can be a little limited in the center area of the table
  • Heavier and more difficult to move than comparable leg table
  • Can look bulky in smaller sizes

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Double Pedestal Table

Trestle Tables

Tables with vertical support near the ends connected with a horizontal support.

Advantages:

  • Stable and sturdy
  • Allows maximum seating around the table vs. leg tables
  • Supports large expansion
  • Great for use with benches and built in dining “booths”

Disadvantages:

  • Leg room can be limited at the head and foot of table
  • Heavier and more difficult to move than comparably-sized leg table

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Trestle Table

Drop Leaf Tables

Tables with expansion leaves that fold down and remain attached to the table.

Advantages:

  • Good for narrow rooms particularly in an active ingress/egress area
  • Great as flexible use furniture: use everyday as a foyer, console or sofa table while supplementing dining options on special occasions

Disadvantages:

  • Typically less stable than other tables when leaves are up
  • Sizes are more limited

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drop leaf table
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